“The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.”

“When the white man came we had the land and they had the bibles; now they have the land and we have the bibles”

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Saturday, 20 December 2014

300,000 women lost lives due to pregnancy and childbirth related complications in 2013, states study

300,000 women lost lives due to pregnancy and childbirth related complications in 2013, states study

Posted on Dec 13 2014 - 11:30pm by Ambika Choudhary Mahajan
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Health experts have cited that lives are being lost everyday due to women giving birth in unsanitary conditions, unsafe water and lack of hygienic equipment in hospitals. Lack of these basic facilities in developing countries lead to loss of precious lives every day, says a report published in the science journal PLOS One.
The report tells how nearly 300,000 women lost their lives due to pregnancy and complications during childbirth, most of them from developing countries. A greater percentage of these deaths were due to “lack of clean water, poor hygiene and sanitation. In fact 38 percent of healthcare facilities in 54 poor countries continue to lack proper sanitation, which puts women at high risk of death. Despite the concerted global efforts for the past 15 years to diminish maternal mortality, the report shows that casualty rate remains 14 times higher in developing countries when compared to developed countries.”

Many Women Give Birth in Unsanitary Conditions, Study Finds

A recent study claims that many women give birth in unsanitary conditions. Numerous experts in health around the world claim that too many newborns and mothers are dying because of improper healthcare services, unhygienic equipment in hospitals, lack of safe water and an absence of sanitary birthing conditions.
The World Health Organization (WHO) claims that as much as 40 percent of all health facilities from around 57 low-income countries don’t have access to clean water and are not able to provide appropriate sanitation. In most cases, authorities from the governments of undeveloped countries tend to neglect the connection between health and proper hygiene.

Sanitation: Hygiene Linked to Healthy Childbirth?

Sanitation is a comfort long taken for granted in modern western delivery rooms, but a recently released study by the World Health Organization (WHO) links the lack of access to good hygiene during pregnancy and childbirth, to increased risk for many third world women and newborns. Appearing in the PLOS Medicine journal on Dec. 12, 2014, the study found that the expected rate of infection and mortality for both mother and infant is significantly higher in low-income birth settings, many of which take place at home in impoverished areas of the world. Even in healthcare facilities, the lack of clean water and sanitation can cause serious complications. The WHO aims to strategically intervene in the growing problem of women’s health and preventable infant mortality.
Read more at http://guardianlv.com/2014/12/sanitation-hygiene-linked-to-healthy-childbirth/#TcSE7KUglObtl0Q0.99




Who are the most generous foreign nationals in the UK to send money home?

Who are the most generous foreign nationals in the UK to send money home?
Almost 40pc of remittances sent in the Christmas period are declared as gifts, with Poles, Nigerians and Americans sending the most money home.
Poles, Nigerians and Americans living in the UK are the most generous when it comes to sending money back home at Christmas time.
Nigeria and Poland receive about a third of the $20bn (£12.8bn) in remittances that leave the UK each year, according to Azimo, the online money transfer service.
Polish people sent an average of £986 each over five transactions from December 1 to 17, while the average Nigerian customer sent a total of £898 across four transfers.
Americans sent £819 each to the US, the average Ghanaian sent £692 and Kenyans sent home £654 each during the festive period.
Austria, Lithuania, Germany, Norway and Argentina round out the top 10.
While 75pc of year-round transfers are to support families with essential living requirements such as buying food and paying bills and are usually sent to one or two recipients, almost 40pc of remittances sent in December are declared as gifts.
The average transfer value drops from £400 to £200 in December but up to six times the number of transactions are processed, suggesting that people are sending seasonal gifts to more people rather than essential cash to one main bill payer.
Azimo, which is available in 19 countries and transfers to 198 countries, cited research showing that three in four migrant workers in the UK save money to be able to send something home each month.
The World Bank estimated that $582bn in remittances will be sent globally this year, of which $435bn will go to developing countries. Those figures rise to $608bn and $454bn for 2015.

Facebook is reportedly working on its own money wiring service , which would allow it to cash in on the billions of dollars that are sent abroad each year as well as extend its reach in emerging markets.
Michael Kent, chief executive of Azimo, said: “Britain’s migrants are not only amongst the most hard-working but also the most generous in our society they send a significant portion of their income home each month to support close family, extended family and even whole local communities.”
Roughly 600,000 Poles and 200,000 Nigerians live in the UK, where salaries are 3.5 times and 13 times higher respectively than their homes countries.
Mr Kent called these workers “the heroes spreading the Christmas cheer.”
= Get the best deal on you international money transfers with the Telegraph Money transfer service - Your first transfer is free =


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